Thermal bridges of RoGBC Heaquarters, showed with infrared camera made by EGEEA Design.

January 15, 2013 at 9:00 am | Posted in General, Green Building Projects, Greening our Wokspace, Member Projects, News from Members | 1 Comment
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The new member of RoGBC, EGEEA Design, has made on 13 December 2012 an survey with a infrared camera of the RoGBC headquarters. As part of the RoGBC pilot project : Greening our Workspace Phase II.

The survey has revealed the main areas where the heat transfer is increased, know as Thermal Bridges. Areas which, besides the energy which is consumed (lost) to the exterior environment, they can develop mold and/or condensation on the interior finishing and also, more evident, they generate a thermal discomfort of the residents.

Below you can find some images from this survey.

the Office ceiling: with a lamp on the left and a thermal bridges on the right.

IR_2806

the Office windows (view from out side): with a thermal bridges on the lower part (parapet) where is also an radiator on the interior.

IR_2817

Attic ceiling

IR_2831

Exeterior view: the darker parts of the attic is covered with snow, the lighter  parts o the attic are thermal bridges which are dry(not covered whit snow) due to the interior-exterior heat transfer.

RoGBC acoperis

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  1. Always great approach presentation as concept, visual impressive to end-customer (developer, owner of building etc, non-specialist), technical aspects “transposed” into economics issues, better understanding thermal bridges not only envelope element etc.

    It would be interesting to have such a study, infrared thermal bridges captures, as a technical comparison for a new “as built” house versus its “design” (real vs expectations).
    Scope: increase awareness on importance of thermal bridge design and especially carefully building, not only choosing best products/materials, but also system performance. Customers should look and ask for design prooving a system performance and detailed “building works book”.
    Lessons learned from executions, prevention and trobleshooting.


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